Many, many years ago in my life as a budding journalist, I wrote a column titled, “Every trickle of water.”
It was literal as well as metamorphic — my search for trout through my life’s journey.
As I look back on that, I think about what pursuing life with a fishing rod in your hand can do for you.
There is a Psalm 23 aspect to it:


When you feel yourself being enclosed and comforted by a coming night;
When just as the light is going to sleep, so many trout are rising to the hatching of life that the bugs provide;
When you realize you are a part of something so “normal” or natural, yet you are not a part of it;
When you realize you have to reel up and head home because there is no more light that you can use to see the fly you were casting, yet all around you, you hear the slurping of fish eating their share;
When you realize beauty is something to see and feel, best to try not to control — it is experiential.


What is wondrous about living life with a fly rod in your hand are the places you find yourself.
As a kid, I marveled at films and photos of the salmon-rich rivers of Alaska and the almost overwhelming views of lakes and rivers throughout the Rocky Mountain West.
They inspired me to live an adult life with fly-fishing as a friend — a pursuit that does not age as you do. It is a great companion.
Movies and photography implanted a wanderlust in me that ultimately created an angling reality — lived.
I have waded in the creeks and rivers of the Pennsylvania of my youth, now knowing and feeling a color of experience that only that time in my life can provide.
It is a time so special and fleeting, that youthful time, that thoughts of it can produce every emotion from tears to a wry smile.
Thinking of it, I begin to smell and feel scenes so calm.
I guess this is something we can aspire to — memories of and around fishing that bring to us an interpreted time of real experiences.
Water, like light, is a conduit.
So many of our experiences spring from our time in and around water — we just take them for granted.
Oftentimes now — and it is something I’m realizing I’ve done throughout my life — I just sit and think about my experiences through the act of fishing.
They are so rich — money could not and cannot buy them.
We are all wealthy.
Begin your journey…
Take a step into a trout stream or river — you may find fortunes abound.

Maybe I will see you on the water.

Murph

Wild brown trout caught fly fishing.

About The Author

Patrick "Murph" Murphy

Patrick Murphy or "Murph" as we call him around the office is a former newspaper man, and currently an author of books and blogs. He is an appreciator of all things natural and avid fisherman.

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